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The Magickal Women Conference, London 2019: A Cele...

The Magickal Women Conference, London 2019: A Celebration of Magickal Women Past, Present & Future

On Saturday 1st June, in the heart of London, something special, some might even say magickal took place: the very first  Magickal Women Conference .

To think that this event might not have happened but for a joke between friends hints at something deeper than accidental – perhaps this event was destined to take place, that the universe aligned to produce the right set of circumstances at the right time so that the idea formed almost organically, or dare I say it – fate.

Whatever the reason, the day was indeed marvelous from beginning to end. Not only did I have the very great honour of speaking but it afforded the opportunity to listen to some truly fantastic talks, as well as taking part in workshops, not to mention just being among some truly amazing women.

The organisers, Sue Terry and Erzebet Barthold should revel in their accomplishment, for as humble as they may be, without these two ladies, this event would never have happened. They created a space where all women of magick, no matter their backgrounds, could come together in mutual appreciation and celebration, and I think that, as well as some awesome speakers, truly made the day something to remember.

After the opening statements from the founders, the event kicked off with keynote speaker Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki, legend and all round magickal badass. After being helped to the stage by a couple of gentlemen attendees ( ”It’s the best way to meet men” she joked), she went on to describe the story of survival of the sorceress and witch, and how magick offers a liberation to those poor, oppressed and dispossessed. She wove together this narrative, linking the past and the present  in telling how she escaped the Nazi’s by boat, drawing parallels with the plight of refugees today in a poignant story of the human cost of conflicts past and present.

Next I saw Shani Oates, listening as she took us through the history (herstory) of the Sybil’s and seers, exploring their relevance today. Then it was ”Magick in the Time of the Inquisition”, brought to us by the very cool Harper Feist. Here she talked about the inequalities and oppression faced by women practitioners of high magick, glorifying (and rightly so!) such figures as Laura Malipiero.

I was also lucky enough to get into the workshop run by artist in residence Victoria Musson. This was an exploration of the magick of the harvest through worship of the land; honouring the natural cycles and rhythms of nature. Then it was the fun part – making corn dollies (not the very ornate type that takes tools and preparation but rather the rough and ready type, the kind someone busy at work in the field might fashion. Rustic, for want of a better word). Victoria makes fantastic pieces of art and devotion from natural materials, utilising different grains to worship the Divine Feminine and to help others rediscover their connection to the land.

 

Alkistis Dimech and her talk ”Flower on Fire (Dance.Sex.Heresy) was next on my agenda. This was extremely fascinating and informative focusing on the connections between dance, sex, trance and magick and how they combine to allow for altered states of consciousness. This conversation also included a rejection of the shame of our sexual natures and desires placed on us by a society that fails to understand us.

And then it was my turn! How honoured I was to be able to talk at such an event! I can’t begin to tell you how nervous and excited I was! ”Rebel Women and Rebel Magick” was an exploration of freedom, magick and rebellion through the story of Nanny of the Maroons. I also talked about rebel magick today and what that means for women practitioners now.

I then went to listen to storyteller in residence Baya Salmon-Hawk and her retelling of the French fairytale ”Bearskin”.  There really is a magick in storytelling and Baya wove her spell expertly. Bearskin is a poignant story, delivered artfully, with passion and humour leaving everyone there spellbound.

Then all too quickly, the closing statement came and went, and the day was over all to quickly. It was time for this witch to leave the big city and head back to the sticks with her heart and soul filled with magick, wishing it was the beginning of the day all over again!

All in all, The first (of many more to come, hopefully) Magickal Women Conference was an amazing success and I’m truly honoured to have been a part of something so special!

Emma Kathryn has an online class available at The House of Twigs: The School of Ritual – Elemental Magick: An Introductory Course

 

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My name is Emma Kathryn, my path a mixture of non-Wiccan Traditional British Witchcraft and Obeah, a blend that represents my heritage. A Devotee of Hekate, my witchcraft is what is needed when needed. I live in the middle of England with my partner, two teenage sons and two crazy dogs.
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My name is Emma Kathryn, my path a mixture of non-Wiccan Traditional British Witchcraft and Obeah, a blend that represents my heritage. A Devotee of Hekate, my witchcraft is what is needed when needed. I live in the middle of England with my partner, two teenage sons and two crazy dogs.
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